Aaron Donald

Breakdown:

#97
Class: Senior
Height: 6’0 1/2″
Weight: 288 lbs.
School: Pittsburgh
Bio:

  • 2013’s most decorated & accomplished defensive player
  • Rotary Lombardi Award Winner – top interior lineman (2013)
  • Nagurski Award Winner – nation’s best defensive player (2013)
  • Bednarik Award Winner – nation’s best defensive player (2013)
  • First-team All-ACC (2013)
  • First-team All-Big East (2012)
  • 2013 stats:  59 tackles, 11 sacks and 28.5 TFL

Senior Bowl Notes

  • The nation’s most decorated defender accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile
  • Monday was a “show me” day for Donald.  He was matched up with Baylor G Cyril Richardson throughout the practice.  Richardson has four inches on Donald and nearly 50 pounds.  Yet, Donald whipped him all day long.  In run fit 1-on-1 Donald whipped the hulky Baylor Bear.  In pass rush, 1-on-1 Donald literally knocked Richardson on his backside.  During team drills, Donald was so quick off the ball that CSU C Weston Richburg couldn’t even get a hand on him.  Hopefully, Donald will get to face a few of the other North OL throughout the week.
  • One NFL defensive coach I spoke with said, “there are just too many guys who don’t have prototype bodies or size around the NFL who continue to produce on the defensive line” and that “teams have got to just look at how this kid plays – it’s that simple…. his game tape is good.”
  • Donald showed great anchor against double teams and was unblockable in one on one drills, but his size will be an issue as many teams have privately confided that they don’t know whether they can play him on non-passing downs due to his lack of size.

Report

Let’s me be as clear as possible, if Aaron Donald were 6’3″ and 300 pounds, there’s no question he’d be a top ten pick.  But, he isn’t and he won’t be because of it and only for that reason.  He has the full package every defensive lineman craves.  Power.  Quickness.  Feet.  Hands.  Hand placement.  Leverage.  He’s just short…er and small…er.

So what?  He can play.  He’s hellified disruptive, gets into OL quickly, takes away the separation easily, drives OL back into the backfield and is one of a rare breed of playmaking defensive linemen.  He’ll be under the microscope all week long down in Mobile as teams attempt to figure out where he fits best in their particular scheme.  He’ll show that he can play a number of different positions in odd or even fronts, but mainly that he can PLAY.  There’s no measuring stick needed to prove that truth.

Billy Turner

Breakdown:

#77
Class: Senior
Height: 6’5″
Weight: 315 lbs.
School: North Dakota State
Bio:

  • Four year starter, 3x FCS national champion (2011, 2012, 2013)
  • FCS Athletics Directors Association Offensive Lineman of the Year (2013)
  • 2x First-team All-Missouri Valley Conference (2012, 2013)
  • Consensus FCS All-American (2012, 2013)
  • Graded out at 90 percent, hasn’t given up a sack all season

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Turner accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.
  • On Monday, Jaguars offensive line coach George Yarno got into Turner with a butt-chewing a couple of times as Turner failed to execute basic functions of the one-on-one drill.  Turner bounced back with good one-on-one pass pro reps against Deandre Coleman and Brent Urban handled himself well in the scrimmage portion at tackle and guard.
  • During Tuesday’s practice, Turner ad his worst day and perhaps the worst day that any player had at the Senior Bowl.  He struggled with Auburn DE Dee Ford’s speed.  He struggled with Arkansas DE Chris Smith’s whirling dervish, maniacal edge rush.  He struggled with power.  He lost his confidence and it was evident late in practice.

Combine Notes

**Combine measurements

  • 40 yard dash – 5.16 seconds
  • Bench Press – 25 reps
  • Vertical Jump – 28″
  • Broad Jump – 9′
  • 3 Cone Drill – 7.92 seconds
  • 20 yard shuttle – 4.71 seconds

**Arm/Hand Measurements

  • Arm length – 34″
  • Hand size – 10″

Pros

  • Uses quick, choppy steps in pass pro maintaining a good base
  • Competitive and aggressive up to the whistle
  • Flexible athlete who plays with determination and confidence
  • Able to get into space and make tough blocks on the move
  • Can recover and redirect on 2nd level or as a pass protector

Cons

  • Level of competition is a concern
  • Despite his athleticism, plays frenetically at times
  • Tends to drop eyes and lead with his head too often
  • High-cut with smaller calves and ankles
  • When he is threatened off the edge he seems to forget technique
  • Needs to mix up a vertical set and quick-set as a tackle

Film Room

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:23 Strong punch on DE trying to make an inside move
1:03 Plays with aggressiveness in running game
2:43 Patient with his punch as he lets his feet do their job
3:16 Quick off the snap and buries his target
3:50 Outstanding targeting and finishing of 2nd level LB
4:36 Drops head and fails to finish assignment
5:43 Notice how flexible his knees and ankles are while in stance
5:38 Kick step almost non-existent and loses edge

Report

Billy Turner absolutely dominated the competition and was named the Offensive Lineman of the Year by the FCS ADA.  Turner runs like a tackle 15 pounds lighter than the 318 he carries and his long arms allowed him to control the athletically inferior competition across from him.

Turner is a quick-twitch left tackle who has the feet to cut off the edge against speed and the arm length to keeep his hands on pass rushers using counter moves inside.  Turner shows great bend which allows him to play with better leverage.  He’s got plus lateral movement making him a fit for teams looking to attack the boundaries with their run game.

The big problem for Turner is that despite his athletic traits, he was exposed at the Senior Bowl one-on-one drills as a player who lacks the proper technique and confidence to come in and play right away.  While I felt like he had enough functional strength, his in ability to get to edge rushers and redirect them – despite his athletic traits – was a big concern for me and teams I spoke with in Mobile.  His draft grade was likely impacted by at least a round.  His final position might be at guard with a zone team.

CJ Mosley

BREAKDOWN:

#32
Class: Senior
Height: 6’2″
Weight: 232 lbs.
School: Alabama
Bio:

  • 2013 Butkus Award recipient – third Alabama player in history to win the Award
  • 2013 Rotary Lombardi Award Finalist
  • 2X Consensus All-American
  • 2X First team All-SEC, 2013 SEC Defensive Player of the Year
  • 2X Alabama Team MVP – also voted Team’s Most Inspirational Player in 2013
  • 2013 Stats: 108 tackles, 9 TFL & 1 Forced fumble

 

COMBINE NOTES

**Combine measurements

  • Vertical Jump – 35″
  • Broad Jump – 9’10”
  • 3 Cone Drill – 7.30 seconds
  • 20 yard shuttle – 4.40 seconds

**Arm/Hand Measurements

  • Arm length – 33 3/8″
  • Hand size – 10 3/4″

PROS

  • Feet never stop – excellent technique
  • Excellent in coverage, strong read recognition
  • Feet get him in position to make form tackle, doesn’t lunge
  • Completely in charge of the defense – makes checks to get out of stunts into another blitz
  • Matches slot receiver or back step for step in man coverage, quite impressive
  • Never plays laterally or backwards – always going forward and downhill
  • Explodes through ball carriers – wraps up on contact
  • Patient, doesn’t over pursue
  • Effective out in open field tackling/playing in space
  • Relentless and physical striker
  • Closing speed on quarterback or ball carrier in space is tremendous
  • His ability to find the ball and not get lost behind “trash” is stellar

CONS

  • Does false step on occasion
  • As with all linebackers, needs to be a bit more violent getting off of blocks
  • Got beat on slot WR nod/shake route
  • Gets “locked up” by OL size up front at times
  • Feet were stationary early in the season when he wasn’t fully conditioned
  • Late reacting to draw after clear run designation (resulted in long run early in game)
  • Stands too tall at times which makes it more difficult to redirect
  • Against slot WR, initially in great position, but loses him after taking eyes to QB
  • Will backpedal in pass drop, instead of turning and running

FILM ROOM

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

1:36 explosive to the football – he scrapes and then bursts through the gap to make a play – stellar
2:17 The speed to close on a fast ball carrier like Everett Golson
4:28 play recognition on smoke draw, does not over pursue, redirects and makes TFL
5:44 play action, takes back out of backfield and shadows him (watch top of the screen)

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

0:10 Takes on block, still needs some work shedding more violently, but makes tackle for short gain
0:45 Makes interception, matches RB out of backfield then reads eyes of QB for interception
1:33 Play recognition, sniffs out screen and makes a tremendous play for TFL
3:47 Tennessee’s physical OL got to him a little bit, trying to skate block and got out of position.

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

0:09 The hit on QB after the blitz is legal, physical and a trendsetter early in the game
1:15 All 22 replay – can see his pass pattern recognition but needs to drive on dig when he sees it
1:57 Shows his uncanny ability on the blitz to seek and destroy the quarterback up in the A gap
2:57 Works through the “trash” to find ball carrier and make perfect form tackle – this is spot on.

REPORT

Mosley played an entire season in the middle of the Alabama defense in 2013, something that he was unable to do in 2012 due to an injury he had suffered in the 2011 BCS National Championship Game.  That’ll be the major question, in my opinion for Mosley – his health.  A number of Alabama players have come into the NFL with an injury history and Mosley has a similar history that could scare off some teams.  That said, he’s the most instinctive defensive player in the draft.  His ability to read and decipher an offensive gameplan is off the charts and he’s a plus tackler in space.  If he runs well at the Combine and/or his Pro Day, his stock will skyrocket.

In 2012, Mosley looked as fresh and healthy against Notre Dame as he had all season.  And, it showed.  Notre Dame got away from run game early due to Alabama’s big lead and it would’ve helped seeing Mosley take on more blockers.  But, this film shows the whole package for a linebacker ready for the next level.

Against Tennessee’s OL in 2012 knew it had to get a hat on Mosley and the Alabama linebackers.  He didn’t do a poor job against the consistent pounding, but it took a toll by the fourth quarter.  That said, watching him match TE, RB and slot WR in pass coverage is impressive.

Missouri’s offense provides a bunch of different idiosyncrasies and nuances but it couldn’t take advantage of Mosley due in large part to his patience and play recognition.  His ability to play in space and most importantly tackle one-on-one is impressive.

C.J Fiedorowicz

Breakdown:

#86
Class: Senior
Height: 6’5 1/2″
Weight: 265 lbs.
School: Iowa
Bio:

  • First-team All-B1G (2013)
  • Team leading six receiving TDs (2013)
  • Finished his career with a 31 game consecutive catch streak
  • Honorable mention All-B1G (2012)
  • 2013 stats:  30 receptions, 299 yards and six TDs

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Fiedorowicz accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.
  • The former Hawkeye had both good and bad moments in Mobile.  He competed hard and blocked effectively most of the week.  He caught the ball well enough.  However, he didn’t blow teams away and remains a solid late day two/early day three prospect.

Combine Notes

**Combine measurements

  • 40 yard dash – 4.76 seconds
  • Bench Press – 25 reps
  • Vertical Jump – 31.5″
  • Broad Jump – 9’8″
  • 3 Cone Drill – 7.10 seconds
  • 20 yard shuttle – 4.26 seconds

**Arm/Hand Measurements

  • Arm length – 33″
  • Hand size – 10 1/4″

Report

Newspapers.  Home phones.  Traditional tight ends.  What are things that we used to know?  What are things that died in the 2000s?  What are things we rarely can find in society in 2014?  Okay, so that’s a little over the top, I mean, you can find newspapers on a Sunday, no?

I kid, but the point is that a traditional tight end, as those of us in our 30s and 40s remember them to be, aren’t often found in college football anymore.  But, Iowa had one of the best ones in C.J Fiedorowicz.  Back in the early to mid-1990s, Fiedorowicz may have been an early second round pick, but given the NFL’s movement seemingly away from the hand in the dirt, lined up at Y, more blocking than receiving tight end, he won’t be.

However, the Patriots found a way to make Rob Gronkowski a star and he’s probably the closest comparison to Fiedorowicz already in the league.  He can do a little of everything but “move TE/H hybrid” types will get more acclaim.  But, hey, don’t we all like to read a newspaper every now and again?  You get the point.

Dee Ford

Breakdown:

#30
Class: Senior
Height: 6’2″
Weight: 246 lbs.
School: Auburn
Bio:

  • Ted Hendricks Award Semi-finalist – nation’s best defensive end (2013)
  • Honorable mention All-American (2013)
  • First-team All-SEC (2013)
  • Had three multiple sack games in 2013, one in 2012
  • 2013 stats:  29 tackles, 10.5 sacks, 14.5 TFL and 17 QB Hurries (in only 12 games)

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Ford accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.

Report

Ford had a slow start to his season, missing the first two games of the year with a knee injury.  However, like his team did in College Station, Ford kick started his season during the TexasA&M game when he faced top tackles Jake Matthews and Cedric Ogbuehi.

He displayed a mix of power, quickness, toughness and play making skills against the Aggie duo.  In the National Championship game, he showed his quickness and burst on a couple of inside moves and, generally, created mayhem for FSU’s solid tackles.  I think his size may keep him from being completely 4-3/3-4 scheme versatile, but he can wreck shop in a hurry.

The Senior Bowl is a great stage for him to prove he can rush from 3-point or from a stand up position.  If he proves he’s comfortable standing up rushing the QB and dropping in coverage during position drills, he’ll be a coveted asset come May 2014.

Aaron Colvin

Breakdown:

#14
Class: Senior
Height: 5’11 1/4″
Weight: 186 lbs.
School: Oklahoma
Bio:

  • 2x First-team All-Big 12 (2012, 2013)
  • Jim Thorpe Award Semi-finalist (2013)
  • Second-team Academic All-Big 12 (2013)
  • Three year starter – one year at SS, two years at CB
  • 2013 stats:  55 tackles, 3.5 sacks, 5 TFL and 1 INT

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Colvin accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.
  • The former Sooner was easily the best cover corner on the South squad.  His press technique footwork needs a little work, but his recovery speed is ridiculous.  He’s fluid, moves smoothly and bends athletically.  He’s polished and had a solid first day in Mobile.
  • Colvin suffered a torn ACL on Tuesday during 1-on-1 drills, an unfortunate instance for a guy that was making a significant impact in Mobile.

Report

Colvin missed a pair of games throughout the season, but he showed up in big games for the Sooners in a big way.  Against Texas Tech in the rain, he had a pick, recovered a fumble and finished the game with seven tackles.

He was the most ballyhooed name going into the 2013 season and it was clear Big 12 teams didn’t want to throw his way.  QBs at the Senior Bowl won’t shy away from him, so this is a tremendous opportunity to get in the top five CB rankings with a strong showing in Mobile.

Seantrel Henderson

Breakdown:

#77
Class: Senior
Height: 6’6 7/12″
Weight: 331 lbs.
School: Miami (FL)
Bio:

  • Third-team All-ACC (2013)
  • Made eight starts at RT (2013)
  • Started seven games at RT (2012)
  • Nation’s top recruit out of HS in 2010

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Henderson accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.
  • On Monday, I was pleasantly surprised with the way that he used his long arms and natural athletic ability to keep Stanford DE Trent Murphy locked up.  Henderson did fall flat on his face after leaning face first into a run block and that has to be corrected on his part, but As someone who has a much lower grade on Henderson than most, it was a decent start to the week.

Pros

  • Wide frame but doesn’t carry much excess weight
  • Despite his massive size, has decent movement skills
  • Shows the ability to get out and make blocks in screen game
  • Has the length to stymie a variety of pass rushing styles
  • Former basketball player
  • Rare mass and length make him intriguing right tackle prospect

Cons

  • Heavy legged
  • Struggles to recover when beat in pass protection
  • Has a tendency to drop his head and not see what he’s blocking in the run game
  • Tends to play too upright when pass protecting
  • Inconsistent weight distribution and gets knocked off-balance because of it
  • Sluggish with his hand in pass pro
  • Pushes more than “grabs and mauls”
  • Suspended multiple times

Film Room

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:40 Outside zone and Henderson has his man blocked initially but can’t stay engaged and loses contact
2:12 Much too stiff-legged with no knee bend allows his man to threaten the edge
4:10 Moves up to 2nd level smoothly and locks up LB
5:04 Despite his length, Henderson gets beat to the punch and then struggles to revover after inside move
7:18 Should be a favorable power block matchup but his man sheds Henderson quickly

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:12 Excellent job of getting out to the perimeter to help spring TD play on WR screen
1:36 Attempts to excecute a cut-block but doesn’t keep his eye on the target and almost takes out his own teammate
2:30 Good initial step to get up to 2nd level and seal LB, but lacks instincts to take proper angle to get him blocked
3:12 Starts to “gallop” and lets feet get too close together losing a proper base.  Gets knocked off-balance due to it
3:45 Locks onto defenders and drives him off the line of scrimmage with power and driving feet

Report

Seantrel Henderson was widely considered to be the top high school recruit in 2009 and initially committed to USC before being granted a release after they were hit with sanctions.  Henderson is a massive man who doesn’t appear to carry much excess weight on his frame.  His body type reminds me of D.J. Fluker.

Henderson came in with a ton of fanfare but has never lived up to the hype.  Despite his massive size and relative athleticism, he hasn’t been able to dominate and was named to the All-ACC Third Team this season.  Henderson does an average to below average job of properly targeting his defender and establishing proper hand placement so that he can use his physical gifts.  Some of his run game flaws appear to be coachable.  If he can get some flaws corrected, he could be a very capable run blocker.

Henderson’s pass protection will always be a problem as he tends to have too much of his weight distributed to his outside foot when he gets into his pass sets.  This is one of the reasons you see Henderson struggle with balance from time to time.  On the next level, edge rushers are going to be a substantial problem for him and when he oversets (and he will), it will leave him wide open inside and with bull rushes.

Not only has Henderson been disappointing on the field, his actions off the field have lead to suspensions in three consecutive seasons.  Teams are willing to take chances on talented players with suspect character, but Henderson’s character concerns and his average body of work makes his Senior Bowl performance extremely important to his draft stock.

Gabe Jackson

Breakdown:

#61
Class: Senior
Height: 6’3 1/4″
Weight: 336 lbs.
School: Mississippi State
Bio:

  • Second-team All-American (2013)
  • 2x First-team All-SEC (2013)
  • C Spire Conerly Trophy winner – first OL ever to win – top player in Mississippi (2013)
  • Kent Hull Award winner – top OL in Mississippi (2013)
  • 3x SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week (2013)

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Jackson accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.
  • Jackson was still heavier than we would have liked, but he carried his weight around pretty well when called upon to move.
  • During team portion, Jackson continues to get his guys blocked except when he’s asked to get across the face of defenders on the backside.
  • He showed an ability to bring his feet with him and finish blocks with power and a strong base.  Overall, he improved his stock in Mobile.

Combine Notes

**Combine measurements

  • 40 yard dash – 5.51 seconds
  • Bench Press – 30 reps
  • Vertical Jump – 29″
  • Broad Jump – 9′
  • 3 Cone Drill – 8.25 seconds
  • 20 yard shuttle – 4.78 seconds

**Arm/Hand Measurements

  • Arm length – 33 3/4″
  • Hand size – 10″

Pros

  • Thick trunk helps him to drop anchor against bull rushers
  • Cant generate power in his punch even in retreat
  • Faced a variety of NFL caliber defensive tackles during his time in college
  • Can control defender’s play side shoulder and turn him
  • Foot quickness is much better when he’s at a lighter weight
  • Good knee bend and general flexibility

Cons

  • Robotic movement in attempts to secure and climb – lacks fluidity
  • Carries excessive “bad weight” which slowed him this year
  • Can be beaten by active, 1-gap DTs
  • Takes inconsistent angles to 2nd level blocks – may lack instincts
  • Has trouble keeping players in his power zone due to slow moving feet
  • Hands will ride outside of the shoulder pads in run game

Film Room

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:02 Gets rag-dolled by grab and pull move on his first snap of the game
1:53 Short steps into power position and finishes with authority
2:32 Takes a curious angle and misses block completely
3:10 Picks up T/E stunt, but was a little sluggish getting back to DE which will get him beat in NFL
3:35 Either #99 is one strong SOB or Jackson fails to generate power despite angle on double team”
4:23 Shows off his raw upper body strength by toppling his man
4:54 Can’t stop penetration by DT who splits center and Jackson
5:20 Jackson gives up inside hand placement and gets beaten
5:37 Does a nice job of keeping defender at bay with well timed hands
6:04 Is able to torque defender and turn him by dominating play side shoulder in head to head battle

Report

Jackson, like Cyril Richardson, is a phone-booth guard who will do his best work in tighter spaces.  Jackson has the knee bend necessary to play with good leverage and does fire out with good pad level on straight-ahead blocks, but gets to high when asked to double team with center or tackle.

To me, Jackson looked heavier and slower in 2013 than he was in 2012 and he simply didn’t have the same quickness of foot that I saw previously.  While Jackson is never going to flash lateral athleticism, I do think his functional quickness will improve a great deal if he can get below 330 pounds.

While Jackson needs to watch getting his hands outside of his opponent’s shoulder pads, he does flash really impressive snatch and torque power almost like you would see from someone with a wrestling background.  Jackson features a strong punch with steady hands in pass protection, but he will have issues with twists and quicker 3-techniques he’s matched up against.

Greg Robinson

Breakdown:

#73
Height: 6’5″
Weight: 332 lbs.
School: Auburn
Bio:

  • Second-team All-American (2013)
  • First-team All-SEC (2013)
  • Started 23 of 24 games in his career
  • Key figure on OL that led the way for the nation’s No. 1 rushing offense
  • Helped lead RB Tre Mason to New York City as a Heisman Finalist

 

Combine Notes

**Robinson was a clear winner at the Combine.

**Combine measurements

  • 40 yard dash – 4.92
  • Bench Press – 32 reps
  • Vertical Jump – 28.5″
  • Broad Jump – 9’5″

**Arm/Hands

  • Arm length – 35″
  • Hands – 10″

Pros

  • Good bend in knees and hips
  • Will launch into his target with upward, jarring punches
  • Keeps hands inside and snatches target with strong hands
  • Proficient in space as a blocker in screen game
  • Initial pad level and leverage out of snap is unmatched in this tackle class
  • Great NFL frame with weight evenly distributed
  • Able to remain engaged and ride out moving targets
  • Nimble, quick-footed athlete
  • Aggressive and physical at the point of attack
  • Dominant run blocker
  • Loves to finish his blocks
  • Initial footwork is solid helping him get to reach blocks
  • Tools and traits to become plus pass protector

 

Cons

  • Limited experience as a pass protector at run-heavy Auburn
  • Flagged for 75 yards including 8 holding penalties (many in run game)
  • Base gets too narrow at times in run game
  • Leans too much as run blocker and needs to bring hips under him
  • Desire to obliterate as run blocker causes him to get out of control at times
  • Waist bender in pass pro
  • Will panic and lunge in protection rather than trusting his feet
  • Weight distribution is too far forward as pass protector

 

 

Film Room

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:12 Displays good patience and body control making 2nd level block
1:01 Extremely quick 1st step out of his pass set
1:42 Takes proper steps, targets and explodes up into the DE but hangs on too long and gets holding call
1:57 Generates power with leverage
2:16 Looks to engage too quickly rather than getting more depth on his pass set
3:07 You can see his bad habit of starting to grab/hold at the end of this play
3:58 Love the aggressiveness, but holds again at the end of the play for no reason
4:08-4:30 Looking for a physical tackle?  Here you are
6:00 Literally lifts defender off of his feet with power, explosion and leverage
6:20 Weight gets too far forward and loses balance

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:38 Explodes from his hips and jars defender backwards with arm extension
:43 Destroys DT on double team block
1:14 Pure power moving his man three yards off the line of scrimmage
1:41 Falls off of his block with weight too far forward
2:24 Works up to second level, but I like the mean part at the end
2:53 Bends waist and drops head upon contact allowing man around the corner

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:50 Robinson gets to reach block and seals from TE spot on right in unbalanced line
:59 Pure, unadulterated power
1:45 Needs to roll hips to mobilize and create better balance
1:58 Should continue moving feet to get into position rather than lunge
2:11 Loses leverage battle and gets flattened
2:33 Not cleanest footwork, but able to get to blitzer off edge
3:06 Out in front of screen and makes crushing block in space
3:46 Strong at point of contact but base narrows and DE able to disengage
5:30 Engages and destroys with elite finishing qualities
6:16 Great change of direction and then instincts to see twist over the top
8:04 Weight gets too far in front and loses balance

Report

Greg Robinson is a redshirt Sophomore who has started at left tackle over his last two seasons earning a First-Team All-SEC selection this year.  Robinson isn’t as tall as most teams like at tackle, but his thick frame and nimble feet more than make up for that.

When it comes to run blocking, Robinson is in a class by himself.  With his strong hands and jarring explosiveness off the snap, Robinson can get into defenders and drive them off the ball in a dominating fashion.  Mostly, Robinson’s blocking took place in smaller spaces, but he has the feet to get outside when asked.

As dominating as Robinson is as a run blocker, he is green as a pass protector.  Robinson allowed 3 sacks over final two games and 9 over the previous two seasons and needs a great deal of technique work so he’ll stop leaning so much rather than just trusting his feet and natural power.

Robinson needs work in pass protection, but he has the necessary traits to turn pass protection into a strength within a couple of years.  When you combine his size, power, feet and overall upside, Robinson has the potential to be the first tackle taken in this year’s draft.

Jack Mewhort

Breakdown:

#74
Class: Senior
Height: 6’5 1/2″
Weight: 309 lbs.
School: Ohio State
Bio:

  • Team co-captain (2013)
  • First-team All-American (2013)
  • First-team All-B1G (2013)
  • 39 career starts
  • Started for the Buckeyes at LG, RG and LT in his four year career

Senior Bowl Notes

  • Mewhort accepted an invitation to play in the 2014 Senior Bowl in Mobile.
  • On Tuesday, Mewhort had his fair share of battles with Stanford DE Trent Murphy, splitting 50/50 with the great Stanford DE.  Murphy got the corner on Mewhort and as we saw in the Orange Bowl, Mewhort struggled with that hard, quick and powerful edge rush.  If he’s got a coaching point to address, it’s just that.
  • The North offensive line is just substantially better than what I see with the South and that includes players like Mewhort and Clemson’s Brandon Thomas have offensive line coaches excited with their strength and ability to finish.

Combine Notes

**Combine measurements

  • 40 yard dash – 5.37 seconds
  • Bench Press – 28 reps
  • Vertical Jump – 26″
  • Broad Jump – 8’5″
  • 3 Cone Drill – 7.79 seconds
  • 20 yard shuttle – 4.64 seconds

**Arm/Hand Measurements

  • Arm length – 34″
  • Hand size – 9 3/4″

Pros

  • Uses excellent footwork in run game
  • Technically sound with his posture and hand usage in pass protection
  • Displays a great deal of confidence in his technique
  • Flashes good body control when asked to make 2nd level blocks
  • Good upper body strength
  • Will win or stalemate in most one on one power situations.  Doesn’t lose very often

 

Cons

  • Displays some stiffness in the lower body
  • Talented phone booth blocker who could struggle getting to backside blocks on zone plays
  • Athleticism is a concern when required to change directions for moving targets in run game
  • Arm length might be an issue

 

 

Film Room

TSV videos provided by Draft Breakdown

:48 Tight steps and powerful base to the target and rolls hips after contact
1:58 Two, quick steps inside and buries b-gap rusher
2:24 Gets up to 2nd level and gets body under control but ended up too high allowing man underneath
3:21 Great ues of technique to get play-side defender walled off
3:38 Doesn’t try to blow up LB, simply squares him up and engages as he is supposed to

Report

I can already tell you that Jack Mewhort will be a favorite of some of the NFL offensive line coaches who study him.  Mewhort offers versatility as he has played both guard spots and left tackle at Ohio State and he was a team captain and was named 1st, 2nd or 3rd team All-American by various outlets.

Mewhort looks bigger than his listed 308 pounds and he appears to play stronger than that weight as well.  While studying him, I noticed that he was able to get consistent push when that was his goal and when he looked to just get guys turned or walled off, he was usually successful with that as well.  Mewhort brings good functional strength to the table and rarely gets jarred as a pass protector thanks to his core strength and technique.

I can promise you that these same offensive line coaches will watch film on Mewhort and see just how well-coached he’s been and how fundamentally sound he is in both the running game and passing game.  Mewhort uses excellent hand placement but doesn’t have the length to just keep pass rushers at the end of his punch.  Mewhort strikes me as a plug and play right tackle who could also move inside to guard in a power scheme.  I suspect his limited athleticism will cause issues with backside cutoffs and reach blocks on the next level.  The more I see from Mewhort, the more I feel like he’s a safe prospect who understands the position and will be a consistent contributor on the next level.